Logo of The 19th.

Few incarcerated women were released during COVID. The ones who remain have struggled.

Aug. 17, 2021
PJIL Associate Director, Alycia Welch, is quoted in this article about the impact of COVID-19 on women in prisons and jails, with a particular focus on “The Pandemic Gender Gap Behind Bars,” a report Alycia and Michele wrote on this issue.
Logo of The 19th.

Trauma on top of trauma: why more women are dying in jails

July 13, 2021
On the anniversary of Sandra Bland’s death at a Texas jail, PJIL Director, Michele Deitch, comments on the impact of COVID on the ongoing issue of rising incarceration rates and deaths of women inside jail facilities. The article cites the report about this issue that Michele and Alycia co-authored, “The Pandemic Gender Gap Behind Bars.” Advisory Committee Chair, Andrea Armstrong, is also quoted on the situation facing women in rural and small jail facilities.
logo

When prisons locked down, prisoners were denied release

June 29, 2021
Citing “Dead Man Waiting,” our report on deaths among those who were approved for parole but were still waiting for their release from prison, this article describes the nationwide problem of release delays due to programming requirements--a problem that was exacerbated during the pandemic.
Image of Texas Standard's logo.

Pandemic-Related Delays Fatal For Texas Prisoners Approved For Parole

June 22, 2021
Michele summarizes findings from “Dead Man Waiting,” our report about deaths among people who were approved for parole release but who continued to languish in Texas prisons.
Image of Newsweek's logo.

Dozens of Texans Died of COVID-19 in Prison Despite Being Granted Parole, Report Finds

June 17, 2021
Michele and Alycia, summarize findings from our Dead Man Waiting report and discuss the implications. The article includes a quote from the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles responding to delayed releases among people approved for parole due to programming requirements.
Texas Tribune icon.

Dozens who died in Texas prisons during the pandemic had been granted parole, new report shows

June 17, 2021
Quoting Michele, this article provides a detailed description of findings from “Dead Man Waiting,” and the factors that contribute to keeping people in prison after they’ve been approved for parole.
Image of NBC News logo.

New report finds parole-approved prisoners waited months for release amid pandemic

June 15, 2021
At least 18 paroled inmates died behind bars last year because the programs they had to complete before they could be released were slowed or stopped cold by the pandemic, a new report says.
Dead man waiting cover. Blue font on white background.

Dead Man Waiting: A brief profile of deaths in Texas prisons among people approved for parole release

June 1, 2021
In a first-of-its-kind analysis, “Dead Man Waiting,” shows that while deaths among parole-approved people increased during the COVID period, this population was already dying in large numbers from other chronic health issues while awaiting release. The report was the subject of a full-length NBC News NOW story, featuring families of people who died after parole approval, as well as several other prominent news outlets.
Cover of the pandemic gender gap. Red font on white background.

Pandemic Gender Gap Behind Bars: Meeting the Needs of Women in Custody During COVID-19 and Planning for the Future

May 1, 2021
This report examines the distinct harms that women in custody experience during incarceration and highlights the ways in which correctional agencies’ COVID-19 restrictions are exacerbating those harms. The report recommends a set of gender-responsive approaches to COVID precautions in corrections facilities that would simultaneously strengthen public health and improve outcomes for women, their families, and communities.
Government executive article. Black text on white background.

Correcting Corrections: Lessons for Prisons and Jails in a Post-COVID World

Jan. 4, 2021
The ultimate lesson of the COVID crisis in our prisons and jails is this: Addressing the issues it has surfaced is not just a good idea, it is a moral imperative. We need to have the vision and courage to correct corrections and work toward a system that is more worthy of our values and ideals—one that uses a public health lens to help build resiliency. For that is the true underpinning of a safer community.